Road to Revolution Time Line Project

 

Introduction:

     In this section of the course entitled the “Road to Revolution”, we will be studying the events which lead the Original 13 Colonies to break away from the mother country and eventually go to war with England to win their independence.  The divided between England and the Colonies did not occur over night, but rather over the course of about twenty years.  During that time several significant events occurred that caused the rift between England and her Colonies that would lead to the Revolutionary War in 1775. 

 

Your Assignment:

     Your assignment will be to research and study the events leading to the Revolutionary War and complete one of the options listed below.  Your project must also be of high quality.  Projects that are not high quality WILL NOT BE ACCEPTED and students will be required to redo sub-quality projects for less possible points.  Throughout this section, no other homework will be assigned so that students may pour all of their effects into completing a high quality project.  Below you will find the events to include in your project as well as your project options and examples of each.  (NOTE: The following options may also be posted on the Internet as a web page.)  

 

The following “Road to Revolution” topics are to be included in your projects:

1.  The French and Indian War

2.  The Proclamation Line of 1763

3.  The Sugar Act

4.  The Quartering Act

5.  The Stamp Act

6.  The Stamp Act Congress

7.  The Declatory Act

8.  The Townshend Acts

9.  The Boston Massacre

10.  The Quit Period

11.  The Gaspee Incident

12.  The Tea Act

13.  The Boston Tea Party

14.  The Intolerable Acts

15.  The First Continental Congress

16.  The Battles of Lexington and Concord

 

Option #1: Create a high quality “timeline” depicting and summarizing the events which lead the Colonies to seek their independence from England and eventually to war with the mother country.  Your timeline should contain at least FIVE pictures and illustrations. It should also include a summary of at least FIVE of the events in the form of a well written paragraph.  The timeline however, should list ALL of the events noted above.  The project should be mounted on a small piece of poster board.   If your project requires more than one small piece of poster board, position several small pieces so that they can be easily unfolded to reveal the entire timeline; however please do not place your timeline on a large piece of poster board.  Be sure to include all of the events listed above in your project and be creative!

 

Option #2: Create a high quality “Cause and Effects” chart depicting and summarizing the events which lead the Colonies to seek their independence from England and eventually to war with the mother country.  Your “Cause and Effects” chart should contain at least FIVE pictures and illustrations.  It should also include a summary of at least FIVE of the events in the form of a well written paragraph.  The project should be mounted on a small piece of poster board.  If your project requires more than one piece of poster board, position several small pieces so that they can be unfolded to reveal the entire chart; however please do not place your chart on a large piece of poster board. 

 

EXAMPLES OF BOTH OPTIONS:

 

 

FEB. 1945! 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

BATTLE OF IWO JIMA
FEB. 1945!
CAUSE INFO!

United States is using a strategy of “island hopping” to get closer to the Japanese home island.  The US needs airfield close enough to Japan to bomb.

 

In Feb. of 1945 the US fought one of the most costly battles of WWII on the small Pacific Island of Iwo Jima.  Although the Marines took only light casualties during their initial landing on the beachhead, the real fighting took place in the island’s interior, where the Japanese defenders had dug into the landscape.  The fierce fighting lasted over a month and cost the lives of over 20,000 American Marines. 

 
EFFECTS!

The Battle of Iwo Jima was an important victory for the US, because the island was only 750 miles from Japan and could be used as a forward base to bomb the Japanese home islands.